Acta Medica International

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 81--85

Selfitis, narcissism, and emotional intelligence: Eliciting the interrelation among medical students in Kolkata, West Bengal


Soumalya Ray1, Tanmay Kanti Panja2, Dipta Kanti Mukhopadhyay1 
1 Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine and Sagore Dutta Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Midnapore Medical College, Midnapore, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Tanmay Kanti Panja
Department of Community Medicine, Midnapore Medical College, Vidyasagar Road, Paschim Medinipur, Midnapore - 721 101, West Bengal
India

Introduction: Selfitis, the obsessive behavior to take and share one's own photographs, is a popular activity among young adults. It is growing with the availability of cheap data and free social network services. Scientific literature considers it as an effort to emphasize self-importance in the context of inadequate social support. The aim was to assess the burden of selfitis among medical students and to identify factors associated with it. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 166 students of a medical college in Kolkata, from December 2019 to March 2020. Materials and Methods: The level of selfitis was assessed using the Selfitis Behavior Scale (SBS). Narcissism was evaluated using Narcissistic Personality Inventory-16 and emotional intelligence (EI) was assessed using the mind tool EI questionnaire. Quantitative data were expressed as mean (±standard deviation) or median (±interquartile range) and qualitative data were expressed in frequency and percentage. Binary logistic regression was done with the level of selfitis as a dependent variable and narcissistic trait, EI, and other sociodemographic, individual characteristics as the independent variable. Results: Around one-third (35.5%) of the respondents had borderline selfitis according to SBS. None of the respondents had acute or chronic selfitis. Perceived presence of recreational activity (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] - 15.71), availability of pocket money (AOR - 69.42), family support (AOR - 6.30), and narcissistic trait (AOR - 3.94) were positively associated with borderline selfitis. Conclusions: Around one-third had borderline selfitis. Narcissism and lack of perceived family support were found to be associated with it.


How to cite this article:
Ray S, Panja TK, Mukhopadhyay DK. Selfitis, narcissism, and emotional intelligence: Eliciting the interrelation among medical students in Kolkata, West Bengal.Acta Med Int 2020;7:81-85


How to cite this URL:
Ray S, Panja TK, Mukhopadhyay DK. Selfitis, narcissism, and emotional intelligence: Eliciting the interrelation among medical students in Kolkata, West Bengal. Acta Med Int [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Apr 15 ];7:81-85
Available from: https://www.actamedicainternational.com/article.asp?issn=2349-0578;year=2020;volume=7;issue=2;spage=81;epage=85;aulast=Ray;type=0