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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 65-69

Household food insufficiency and child nutritional status in urban slum, Dhaka, Bangladesh


1 Field Research Officer, Centre for Vaccine Sciences, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
2 USAID Intern Fellow, Department of Public Health, State University of Bangladesh, Bangladesh
3 Project Research Manager, Centre for Vaccine Sciences, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
4 Senior Scientist and Head, Parasitology Laboratory, Centre for Vaccine Sciences, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
5 Associate Professor and Head, Department of Public Health State University of Bangladesh; Field Research Officer, Centre for Vaccine Sciences, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh

Correspondence Address:
Nawzia Yasmin
Associate Professor and Head, Department of Public Health State University of Bangladesh; Field Research Offi cer, Centre for Vaccine Sciences, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research
Bangladesh
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.5530/ami.2015.1.10

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Introduction: Malnourished children are about 20% in the developing world. Food insecurity is a key risk factor for child malnutrition Food insufficiency, an extreme form of household food insecurity, can affect physiological mechanisms that are linked to an individual': nutritional status. Food-insufficient children are also more likely to have poorer health status and to experience a range of negative academic and psychosocial outcomes. Methods: We administered a cross-sectional socioeconomic survey to 354 households ir research site, including a validated food insufficiency measurement questionnaire, and obtained anthropometric measurement: from children aged 12 to 24 months. We used chi-square tests to assess the relationship between household food insufficiency an nutritional status of children. Results: Average age of study children was 18 months and standard deviation was (± 3.2 months) The status of household food insufficiency was 56%. The prevalence of underweight, stunting and wasting was 24%, 36% and 8% respectively. The household food insufficiency was significantly (p<.05) associated with underweight and stunting but not witt wasting (p>0.05). Discussion: The study results indicate that food insufficiency is associated with stunting and underweight bu not with wasting in urban slum of Bangladesh. We also found that child malnutrition is associated with mother's education, father': education, monthly family income and people per room.


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